ahk-soo \ˈmīt\

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.


theblackoaksyndicate:

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Become a member at http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka. This is just an example of the corruption that South Dakota DSS perpetuates. Learn more about the Mette Case at http://lakotalaw.org/special-reports/the-mette-affair. There are many stories like this, which is why we are assisting the Lakota tribes to create their own foster care system. Free the Mette Children! The South Dakota Dept. of Social Services placed 7 Lakota foster children into foster care with a non-Native, known molester. In what appears to be a common situation, the state of South Dakota placed 7 Lakota children into a foster family with a known molester, Richard Mette, and his enabling wife, Wendy Mette, from 2000 to 2013. The DSS knew of the accusations against Mr. Mette, but still placed Lakota foster children with him. The state ignored MULTIPLE complaints of sexual and physical abuse, and pleas for help from the children. 1. In 2001, the state ignored the foster boys’ complaints of molestation, and simply made the Mette adoptive parents sign a contract pledging to discontinue any illegal behavior. 2. In 2007, one of the girls told the police how she was sexually molested by Mr. Mette. She reported that Mrs. Mette knew about the molestations. Again, the DSS defended the Mette foster parents, and allowed the children to stay in the home. 3. Afterwards, Kelly, the older foster sister who had aged out of the Mette foster family, was getting reports from her younger siblings that the sexual and physical abuse was increasing and intensifying. She reported this to the South Dakota DSS, who ignored it and said they did not believe the children. Yankton Doctor sees bruises and reports abuse. In October 2010, the only boy among the Mette foster siblings at that time went to see a doctor at the Human Services Center in Yankton, S.D. The child, covered with bruises, disclosed abuse occurring in his adoptive home. He also detailed how Richard Mette, the adoptive father, was molesting the girls. The doctor contacted the authorities at once.  Brandon Taliaferro, the Assistant State’s Attorney responsible for criminal child abuse cases in Brown County, immediately began an investigation. The police search the Mette house and find more evidence of sexual abuse, including enough pornography to “pack a store”, including “family incest” porn. The children revealed they had been subjected to physical abuse, sexual molestation and threats of being beaten if they did not comply with the molestation or if they told anyone. In addition, the children explained that they were often given a choice between “b***jobs or beatings”. The children say they were forced to watch incest porn with Mr. Mette. The children were told that the porn, with titles like “Family Heat”, is how families are supposed to act.  The disgusted police charged Mr. Mette with 23 counts of child rape and incest, and Mrs. Mette with 11 counts of physical abuse and enabling. The State prosecutor, however, first attempted to drop all charges, and charged sexual predator Mr. Mette with only one count of “spanking”. When the State was not allowed to do this, they decided to charge Mr. Mette with only one count of rape of a child under 10. The other 22 charges of aggravated child rape and incest were dropped. The State then dropped all charges against Mrs. Mette, who the children said knew about and enabled the abuse. Children are now back with Mrs. Mette, where they can’t sue the State DSS. As the state’s DCI agent explained, South Dakota fears that they will face an expensive lawsuit by the seven Lakota foster children whose complaints of sexual abuse were ignored by the state for 10 years. Since they are now minors in the custody of Wendy Mette, the person who enabled the abuse, they cannot sue the state without her permission and support. What can we do?  Please call Tony West, the Associate Attorney General of the United States, and let him know that the federal Department of Justice needs to Free the Mette Children immediately!  (202) 514-9500 Learn more: www.lakotalaw.org/special-reports/the-mette-affair

SIGNAL. FUCKING. BOOST.
View Larger

theblackoaksyndicate:

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Become a member at http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka. This is just an example of the corruption that South Dakota DSS perpetuates. Learn more about the Mette Case at http://lakotalaw.org/special-reports/the-mette-affair. There are many stories like this, which is why we are assisting the Lakota tribes to create their own foster care system.

Free the Mette Children!

The South Dakota Dept. of Social Services placed 7 Lakota foster
children into foster care with a non-Native, known molester.

In what appears to be a common situation, the state of South Dakota placed 7 Lakota children into a foster family with a known molester, Richard Mette, and his enabling wife, Wendy Mette, from 2000 to 2013. The DSS knew of the accusations against Mr. Mette, but still placed Lakota foster children with him.

The state ignored MULTIPLE complaints of sexual and physical
abuse, and pleas for help from the children.

1. In 2001, the state ignored the foster boys’ complaints of molestation, and simply made the Mette adoptive parents sign a contract pledging to discontinue any illegal behavior.

2. In 2007, one of the girls told the police how she was sexually molested by Mr. Mette. She reported that Mrs. Mette knew about the molestations. Again, the DSS defended the Mette foster parents, and allowed the children to stay in the home.

3. Afterwards, Kelly, the older foster sister who had aged out of the Mette foster family, was getting reports from her younger siblings that the sexual and physical abuse was increasing and intensifying. She reported this to the South Dakota DSS, who ignored it and said they did not believe the children.

Yankton Doctor sees bruises and reports abuse. In October 2010, the only boy among the Mette foster siblings at that time went to see a doctor at the Human Services Center in Yankton, S.D. The child, covered with bruises, disclosed abuse occurring in his adoptive home. He also detailed how Richard Mette, the adoptive father, was molesting the girls. The doctor contacted the authorities at once.

Brandon Taliaferro, the Assistant State’s Attorney responsible for criminal child abuse cases in Brown County, immediately began an investigation.

The police search the Mette house and find more evidence of sexual abuse, including enough pornography to “pack a store”, including “family incest” porn.

The children revealed they had been subjected to physical abuse, sexual molestation and threats of being beaten if they did not comply with the molestation or if they told anyone. In addition, the children explained that they were often given a choice between “b***jobs or beatings”.

The children say they were forced to watch incest porn with Mr. Mette. The children were told that the porn, with titles like “Family Heat”, is how families are supposed to act.

The disgusted police charged Mr. Mette with 23 counts of child rape and incest, and Mrs. Mette with 11 counts of physical abuse and enabling.

The State prosecutor, however, first attempted to drop all charges, and charged sexual predator Mr. Mette with only one count of “spanking”.

When the State was not allowed to do this, they decided to charge Mr. Mette with only one count of rape of a child under 10. The other 22 charges of aggravated child rape and incest were
dropped.

The State then dropped all charges against Mrs. Mette, who the children said knew about and enabled the abuse.

Children are now back with Mrs. Mette, where they can’t sue the State DSS. As the state’s DCI agent explained, South Dakota fears that they will face an expensive lawsuit by the seven Lakota foster children whose complaints of sexual abuse were ignored by the state
for 10 years. Since they are now minors in the custody of Wendy Mette, the person who enabled the abuse, they cannot sue the state without her permission and support.

What can we do?

Please call Tony West, the Associate Attorney General of the United States, and let him know that the federal Department of Justice needs to Free the Mette Children immediately!
(202) 514-9500

Learn more: www.lakotalaw.org/special-reports/the-mette-affair

SIGNAL. FUCKING. BOOST.


likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway

likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava

"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective.

His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.

DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”

I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava

1. Man in Window

2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York

3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat

4. Woman on Train

5. Window and Stove

6. Man with Portfolio

7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 

8. Kids God Bless

9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs

10. Hallway


rockluke:

stilesinatrenchcoat:

phoenixx23:

spookyflys:


thanl:


psyducked:


romancingthelookyloos:


romancingthelookyloos:


I think we should talk about puberty…





yo imma let you finish but


I had one of the best puberty transformations of all time



yes okay but

girls can do it too


Step back, peeps, and fasten your seat-belts.  Time to bring in a puberty professional.
BEFORE PUBERTY:
After puberty:

…. wait.  That’s not right.  Hold on.
Let’s fast-forward about five more years.

Ah, yes, there we go.  Right after I sold my soul to Satan. 


fuckin

PLOT
TWIST


Naw son you can’t be hot in two genders you fucking cheated

this is my favorite post because its just people bragging about how hot they are
View Larger

rockluke:

stilesinatrenchcoat:

phoenixx23:

spookyflys:

thanl:

psyducked:

romancingthelookyloos:

romancingthelookyloos:

I think we should talk about puberty…

image

yo imma let you finish but

I had one of the best puberty transformations of all time

yes okay but

girls can do it too

Step back, peeps, and fasten your seat-belts.  Time to bring in a puberty professional.

BEFORE PUBERTY:

image

After puberty:

image

…. wait.  That’s not right.  Hold on.

Let’s fast-forward about five more years.

image

Ah, yes, there we go.  Right after I sold my soul to Satan. 

fuckin

photo IMG_0998_zps8237a196.jpg

PLOT

photo 168953_175287445844057_6570840_n-1_zps737126b9.jpgTWIST

photo 537080_221894307976482_994889695_n_zps3943ffdd.jpg

Naw son you can’t be hot in two genders you fucking cheated

this is my favorite post because its just people bragging about how hot they are